WCSU

Artist Profiles

Artist Profiles - Saxophonist John Coltrane

John William Coltrane was an jazz saxophonist and composer.

Coltrane was born September 23, 1926 in Hamlet North Carolina. Coltrane grew up in High Point NC, moving to Philadelphia PA in June 1943. He was inducted into the Navy in 1945, returning to civilian life in 1946. He joined Dizzy Gillespie’s big band in 1949. He stayed with Gillespie through the band’s breakup in May 1950 and worked with Gillespie’s small group until April 1951.

In early 1952 he joined Earl...

Read More

The voice of country singer-songwriter Blaze Foley sounds familiar, even if you've never heard it. It has a timbre, an ache that doesn't slow a song — as if to say, "Look how sad I am" — but drives it.

Foley was one of those artists who, however unruly his life, could center himself in his writing and playing long enough to sit in judgment on himself. That's what the director Ethan Hawke and the star Ben Dickey capture in the new film Blaze — and whatever else they miss it's more than enough.

The cause of the surprising January death of Dolores O'Riordan, singer of Irish band The Cranberries who rose to fame in the '90s with a string of radio hits including "Zombie" and "Linger," has been determined. London Inner West coroner Dr. Shirley Radcliffe found O'Riordan's death to have been an accident, caused by alcohol intoxication and drowning.

This story is the first in NPR's new Morning Edition series produced by The Kitchen Sisters (Davia Nelson & Nikki Silva) called The Keepers, stories of activist, archivists, rogue librarians, curators, collectors and historians — keepers of the culture and the cultures and collections they keep.

Over a decade ago, students of Dr. Marcyliena Morgan, then a Professor of Linguistics at UCLA, started dropping by her office, imploring her to listen to hip-hop.

As you read this, the NPR Movies team is settling into their seats in movie theaters across downtown Toronto. For the next week, we'll be sitting in those seats or ones very similar to them, in the dark, taking furious notes, as we each power through marathon sessions of movie-watching.

There was a time when journalist April Ryan was just another face in the crowd of the White House press briefing room.

She started covering the White House for American Urban Radio Networks more than 20 years ago. In an interview with NPR, she looks back at how nervous she was the first time she raised her hand to ask a question.

Sylvia Acevedo grew up on a dirt road in New Mexico. Her family was poor, living "paycheck to paycheck."

After a meningitis outbreak in her Las Cruces neighborhood nearly killed her younger sister, her mother moved the family to a different neighborhood. At her new school, young Acevedo knew no one. Until a classmate convinced her to become a Brownie Girl Scout.

And from that moment, she says, her life took on a new path.

On one camping trip, Acevedo's troop leader saw her looking up at the stars.

Former Secretary of State John Kerry says that partisan politics are harming America — and they have been for a while. In fact, when he ran for president in 2004, Kerry, then a Democratic senator from Massachusetts, contemplated naming Republican Sen. John McCain as his running mate.

In an epigraph to The Most Dangerous Branch: Inside the Supreme Court's Assault on the Constitution, Justice William J. Brennan is quoted as saying of the nation's highest court: "If you have five votes here, you can do anything."

Justice Brennan, who died in 1997, was celebrated for path-breaking opinions but also for his effectiveness as a behind-the-scenes, judicial deal-maker. In this possible majority of one that Brennan describes, author David A. Kaplan, a former legal affairs editor of Newsweek, reads danger.

Senior medical student Giselle Lynch has plenty of accomplishments to list when she applies for a coveted spot in an ophthalmology residency program this fall.

But one box she won't be able to check when she submits her application is one of the highest academic awards medical students can receive, election to the honor society Alpha Omega Alpha.

"Your Best Life "is a new public affairs radio program that aims to increase awareness of the forces at work – at the national, state, and local level – that are impacting people health, quality of life, and length of life. The show aims to empower people not only to understand important issues, but to take action. Issues include tips and tricks from experts, personal testimonials, and health and social service information from community partners. Hosted by Cheryl Scroggins, tune into WCSU Jazzy 88.9 every first Wednesday of the month at 9pm EST to listen to Your Best Life!

Pages

What Are Your Favorite Programs on Jazzy 88.9?

WCSU-FM is committed to giving you the best in Jazz/Funk/Gospel/Blues/Public Affairs. Let us know what your favorite programs are & why.

Tune in to Destination Jazz - Mon-Fri At 2 PM

Tony Marcel Chappel will route your afternoons with contemporary jazz with weather & traffic updates at 2 PM.

Wednesdays At Noon/Saturdays at 4 PM

“The Groove,” with host Rufus Harrison, The show features contemporary jazz artists like Gerald Albright, Marion Meadows, George Benson & Marcus Miller.

Wednesdays at 5:30 PM

Miami Valley Speaks

Julie Holmes-Taylor from the Greene County Animal Control Center will talk about its expansion project & future space to handle stray animals.

Promote Your Business with WCSU-FM

Highly successful businesses understand the importance of advertising as well as the importance of social responsibility. What if you could do both and save money?

Keep WCSU wherever you go. Download the WCSU Public Radio App. The WCSU Public Radio App allows you to conveniently listen to your favorite jazz and news programs on your favorite mobile device.

Dr. Robert Franklin - General Manager

Tony Marcel Chappel - Operations Manager

Robert Trent Newell - Broadcast Support Services Manager

Stephon Lane - Broadcast Technician Manager

Lena Fields Arnold - Underwriting/Marketing Representative

Board Of Trustees